Bespoke Tailoring

Ross

 

 

Prices start from £1600 for a 2-Piece Suit.

The process takes 3-4 Months

Click here to see how it works.


 Why Bespoke?

"Bespoke" is an often misused term so it can be a little confusing to know what it really means these days. 

The term comes from the verb “Bespeak” and refers to the customer selecting their cloth, at which point it becomes spoken for, or “Be-spoken For”.

The modern definition of a Bespoke suit is one which is cut from a completely unique pattern made using the client's measurements, rather than an altered block. This ensures a much more accurate fit. It must have inlays, be finished by hand (including the buttonholes) and involve at least 3 fittings to perfect the cut.

How do you know Bespoke is for you?

 

How it Works

Step 1 - Coffee 

Whatever the occasion: work, wedding, school reunion, we will help you design the perfect suit.

There is no obligation to take the order any further at this stage so we thoroughly recommend meeting up for a chat even if you aren’t sure whether Bespoke is for you.

Step 2 - Cloth (the fun bit) 

Our experienced tailors will help you chose the right fabric for you. Whether it is the perfect shade of navy, a Prince of Wales check or a retro chalk stripe, we will help you find exactly what you are looking for in a weight and composition which best suits you.

 

 

Kipper and Chalk - Cloth Choice 


 

Once you have the cloth for the suit, it’s time to get creative choosing colours or patterns for your lining. Or explore our Bespoke Lining options.

 Tape Measure 

Step 3 - Measuring 

Your tailor will then take around 30 measurements that will account for posture, sleeve pitch and any asymmetries unique to you. At this stage it is common for the tailor to take pictures of your stance to refer to later in the pattern making stage.

That’s you done for now.

 

 


Step 4 - The Pattern
 The Cutter uses all of your measurements to create a completely unique paper pattern. This will take into consideration not only the figures from the measuring appointment but also any information as to how you may use the suit and what kind of fit you prefer.  
This paper pattern will be kept safe and used for years to come.

 

Step 5 - Cutting
Using the individual pattern, the Cutter will strike out your suit onto the chosen cloth. Inlay will be added in case of any large lunches in the future! Cutting the cloth by hand, they will take care to match any stripes or checks, and make adjustments for any asymmetries. The Cutter then separates the cloth, lining and trimmings by type of garment and gives the bundles to the respective maker (coat-maker, trouser-maker and, if needed, waistcoat-maker).

 

Step 6 - Sewing (the magic bit)

The relevant maker then waves their wand (*needle) and turns the flat pieces of material into a beautifully crafted suit.

 To begin with they will baste the suit together using loose hand-sewn stitches. This is because it can be difficult to measure things like the balance of stance, or the angle of the shoulders so there are likely to be alterations needed after the first fitting. The hand sewn stitches are removed after the first fitting to make applying these adjustments simple.

 Step 7- The Fitting

Once the tailors have assembled their bundles, you will be called in for the first fitting. This will be your first glimpse of the suit which can seem a little odd due to the white thread holding it all together. But trust us - it is all part of the process. 

After the first fitting, the tailors will add pockets and linings at which point there will be a second fitting. Once the tailor is happy that the suit is perfectly fitted, the under collar will be shaped, top collar added by hand and the white basting cotton removed.

 

Step 8 - Hand finishing 

Your suit will then be sent to a hand finisher who will fell the linings (making it easier to alter following aforementioned lunches), secure the edges and add the buttonholes.

Step 9 - Pressing 

Lastly, the suit will be professionally pressed off, the buttons will be added and you will be invited to your third and final fitting. All that is then left is for you to take your suit away and bask in the inevitable compliments which will ensue.

 

 

Please note - you should allow 4 to 6 weeks between fittings to allow us to do our thing. The entire process, from that first coffee to the finished article, will take roughly 3 months.